Wood Types Guide _ Each wood type has its own characteristics which need to be taken into consideration before making your purchasing decision. The adjacent table is meant to guide you here.

 

Hardness _ All woods that Berg & Berg use (except pine) for the surface layer are hardwoods. Harder woods are more suited for floors that have to withstand particular wear and tear and also especially when the floor surface is varnished. The hardness of the wood does not play a decisive role for oiled surfaces. Pine has a long tradition as a flooring species in Scandinavia. It is appreciated for its beauty even though it belongs to the "softwood" family.

 

Dimensional stability _ Dimensional Stability is important when laying on heated floors or in regions where there are considerable climate changes. The more stable the wood is, the less is the tendency of open joints appearing.

 

Exposure to light _ Wood is a natural product and changes its colour when exposed to UV light. Light woods tend to darken and dark woods tend to go light-coloured. Colour differences between strips tend to disappear over time. Pigmented floors, e.g. white or darkly oiled, hardly alter in colour. Naturally-oiled floors are made more intense in colour and richer in contrast due to the oil finishing.

 

WOOD TYPE
Origin

 

Hardness
1–4

 

Dimensional Stability
1–4

 

Alteration upon UV Light
1–4

 
 

OAK
Sweden

 

Class 3
very hard

 

Class 4
excellent

 

Class 3
very stable in colour

 
 

RED OAK
Sweden

 

Class 3
very hard

 

Class 4
excellent

 

Class 3
very stable in colour

 
 

ASH
Sweden

 

Class 3
very hard

 

Class 3
very good

 

Class 3
very stable in colour

 
 

BEECH
Sweden

 

Class 3
very hard

 

Class 1
low

 

Class 2
stable in colour

 
 

SILVER MAPLE
Sweden

 

Class 3
very hard

 

Class 1
low

 

Class 3
very stable in colour

 
 

PINE
Sweden

 

Class 1
minor hard

 

Class 3
very good

 

Class 1
will noticeably darken